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  1. kronin323

    kronin323 Font of Useless Knowledge Premium Member

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    Okay, I made a tongue-in-cheek comment in another thread about starting a cast-iron cookware thread, yet it actually got some interest, enough to start a discussion and see where it goes.

    So to start off, whatcha got?

    @Orion @Luis
    @GRFMotorsports (tags don't work for him for some reason but doing it anyway)
    @NoFair?
     
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  2. NoFair

    NoFair Oakley Collector

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    Some old Norwegian ones, a deBuyer and an OBH Nordica from their lightweight cast iron line (works best on gas imho, not as good on a traditional stove)

    We also use cast iron pots for stews etc. They conduct heat a lot faster than most pans/skillets (On an induction stove this isn't that much of a deal) and they never wear out.

    They are actually best when they have been used a couple of years.
     
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  3. The_Darkone

    The_Darkone Oakley Collector Premium Member

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    I actually bought my first cast iron cookware item a few months ago so I'm interested to see where this goes.

    I purchased a skillet with the ridges in the bottom so cleaning is difficult even with the nylon scraper made for it when I cook meats that have been marinated. Any tips?

    Seasoning skillet tips?

    Maintaining said Seasoning?

    Heating on stove to dry?

    I have read a lot of different things on the Web so any voices of experience would be great!
     
  4. Lexkempo

    Lexkempo Frog Fanatic

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    Le Creuset



    / thread


    :p
     
  5. kronin323

    kronin323 Font of Useless Knowledge Premium Member

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    When I first struck out on my own I gathered some small smattering of random cheap crappy pots and pans, but that didn't matter much because back then I didn't cook much nor had any skills.

    Then sometime about 20 years ago I was given a set of hand-me-down non-stick anodized aluminum pots and pans, which became my main set as I started getting into cooking. When I got married almost 9 years ago, I ala-carted up a set of Calphalon non-stick anodized aluminum, which has been by main set ever since, with the earlier set as backup.

    But back when I was given those hand-me-downs, I was also given a bunch of old cast iron, much of which had been in the family for a couple generations. I didn't really know how to properly use or care for them but I'm a bit of a pack rat so I didn't get rid of them, they've been stored away all these years.

    Then at the beginning of this year I started doing that plated.com thing. They had one dish that you cook on the stovetop then move the skillet to the oven to finish. I couldn't do that with my anodized aluminum, so I dug out one of those old cast iron pans, a 12" skillet, and used that. And I've been using it ever since, for the past 6 months or so. I started using a high-carbon steel wok a couple years ago so I'd already learned proper use and care (it's the same for cast iron) by then.

    At some point I became more curious about it and did some research, dug up the rest of the stuff. Been learning, and practicing, a bunch of stuff since. But I'll save that for a later post...
     
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  6. kronin323

    kronin323 Font of Useless Knowledge Premium Member

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    Yes, I have some tips, but some questions first - who made it, and did it come preseasoned?
     
  7. The_Darkone

    The_Darkone Oakley Collector Premium Member

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    It is just a cheap Lodge cast iron skillet that was pre-seasoned because I'm a newbie and didn't want to invest in an expensive skillet if it didn't work out for me. I looked at the Le-Creuset as well but they have a protective satin finish on the inside so wasn't sure about that vs. a good old plain cast iron skillet either.
     
  8. kronin323

    kronin323 Font of Useless Knowledge Premium Member

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    Lodge is a well respected brand, really the last survivor from the vintage days (speaking of the American cast iron industry). Vintage Lodge cast iron is collectible.

    So if it's preseasoned, you don't really need to worry about reseasoning it unless you strip the seasoning somehow. What you have to do is maintain and build up the seasoning. And really that just takes use, the more you use it the more it builds up.

    I'll go into cleaning in more detail later but just realize that new cast iron, even if preseasoned, won't yet be as non-stick as it will after the seasoning is more mature. So you should use a greater amount of oil for a while until that seasoning builds up better.

    Then after you wash it, hand dry it. I do heat them up a little on the stove afterwards to ensure they're completely dry. Like you said, there's differing opinions whether to do that under high or low heat. I've tried both in numerous variations, not only to dry but to increase seasoning. My conclusion is you should use low-med heat with only the goal of drying it, not increasing seasoning. The seasoning you build through actual cooking is better than what you get trying to force it on over the stovetop. After it cools, I rub a very thin layer of vegetable oil on the cooking surface (and you can do that all over if the seasoning on the outside needs more). This is merely for added protection, but it helps add to the seasoning the next time I use it.
     
  9. Luis

    Luis Oakley Enthusiast

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    I also bought a Lodge skillet that I saw on Slickdeals for sale on Target.

    I used to own a cast iron frying pan about 15 years ago. Didn't know how to care for it and eventually it was just a rusty pan.

    Now I've watched YouTube videos so the first thing I did is fry bacon, even though it is supposed to be pre seasoned.

    How do I maintain the seasoning? Any magic formula?
     
  10. kronin323

    kronin323 Font of Useless Knowledge Premium Member

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    Short answer, don't damage the existing seasoning by how you clean it, then continue to build it by using it. It takes time.

    I gave some more details on building it in that earlier post but let me talk more about ways to clean it. Of course with all of this there are multiple answers out there so all I can say is what has worked for me through trial and error.