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  1. pingmonster

    pingmonster Oakley Beginner

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    Sorry to be blunt.....and know nothing about light and all.....
    Is it possible or does it even exist "Clear Polarized Len"
    What I'm getting at is .... I want to see natural color but just cut down glare..
     
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  2. Romeo Van Frogskinstein

    Romeo Van Frogskinstein Oakley Enthusiast

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    There is no Oakley Clear Polarized lens, with a transmission for Clear of 93% it would seem incongruous to have a version with Polarization. The highest transmission I can think of on a Polarized lens is 39% for Light Grey Polarized, much above this would seem pointless since the higher transmission would let more light in whilst Polarized would create reduction.
     
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  3. Herbsley

    Herbsley Royal Duke of Hijinx

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    Agreed.
    And I would imagine that the neutral base of Light Grey Polarised would be as close as you could get to 'seeing natural colour' thru a polarised Oakley lens.
     
  4. Rustpot

    Rustpot M Frame Lover Premium Member

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    Titanium clear might be an option. The iridium coating does help reduce glare.

    The polarized filter itself has a tint to it, that's why the polarized version of lenses is always darker. The Light Grey Polarized may be just what you describe, but is as light as they can make a polarized lens.

    I heard Oakley was working on truly clear polarized, but I don't recall when or where I heard that.
     
  5. coolstorm92

    coolstorm92 Oakley Enthusiast

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    I was told by optician at lenscrafters it is not possible, yet.
     
  6. Oakster

    Oakster Oakley Expert Premium Member Lifetime Member

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    I heard that too - not much application on the sun side, but whoever's the first to do it on the optical side will be HUGE!
     
  7. Beancooker

    Beancooker Oakley Enthusiast

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    I don't see why it wouldn't be possible. I have a clear lens filter for my Canon camera that is clear polarized. Polarizing a lens isn't the same as tinting it. It's a light "filter" that changes the direction of the light. While it is gray in color, it allows aprox 90+% of the light through.
    Aside of it not being worth the initial investment to make a clear lens that is polarized, because of the small margin of people who would be interested, the technology is available. The Canon polarizing filter is more expensive (than a sunglass lens) because it polarizes circularly, not linearly. So it doesn't matter how you have it installed (screwed on), you don't have to "find the horizon" to have it work correctly. There is a link below in case you're interested.

    http://shop.usa.canon.com/shop/en/catalog/72mm-circular-polarizer-pl-cb
     
  8. Rustpot

    Rustpot M Frame Lover Premium Member

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    IIRC sunglasses use linear filters, since the incident light is usually reflected up from a horizontal surface. Part of why sunglasses don't handle glare on cars as well, the lights not coming from below as much.

    Linear is more effective, but they're becoming obsolete in the camera industry as more cameras use auto focus and metering through the lens.

    I had an old film SLR that was made in the 80's with a rotating linear polarizer and it was magnificent to play with. Circular polarizing filters suck in comparison. And with linear you can stack them and compensate with increased exposure. Fun stuff, but my photography skills are all but forgotten now.