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  1. Rezechs

    Rezechs Oakley Enthusiast

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    I've trimmed my jawbone lenses before to fit in my split jacket frame but this is the first time ive done a real cut and it was interesting...

    started off by masking off the donor crosshair lenses and tracing out the original lenses of my Mars.
    My First Real Lens Cutting Journey - IMG_20130906_144424_511_zpsc11d9b0a.jpg

    I was originally doing it with me holding the lens in 1 hand and a dremel in the other, i was very supprised at how easily the lens actually cut and could tell that if i lost attention for even the smallest of a second i can easily cut 2 much off and ruin it, it was not very steady using my 1 hand with the dremel so after i got the rough shape finished i threw it into my table vice so i could use 2 hands and really take my time to make the final shape of the lens.
    My First Real Lens Cutting Journey - IMG_20130906_171011_947_zpsd401d429.jpg

    It wasn't until my 2nd lens that i realized it is wayyy easier if i cut the tape around the final shape of the lens to avoid the burrs of tape that come up from sanding the edges and make it hard to see the line to cut.

    It took probably around 1hr for 1st lens 45 for the 2nd, overall i am happy with the results the lenses fit, there are no scratches and once i get the c-clips they will look great only issue is the left orbital lens does have a tiny little gap that is barely noticeable once installed but you cannot see it once the frame is on.

    Final Product
    The smudge on the right lens in the picture are just fingerprints.
    My First Real Lens Cutting Journey - IMG_20130906_171313_209_zps80c6b25a.jpg
    My First Real Lens Cutting Journey - IMG_20130906_171726_206_zpse53504a4.jpg
    Oh and it does get pretty messy
    My First Real Lens Cutting Journey - IMG_20130906_171104_0291_zps6d09665e.jpg
    Now i just have to send them off to THE X-MAN to do a refinish and straighten the arms hopefully in a few days from now =)
     
    Dallas O Hog and atrain like this.
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  2. InfiniteHero

    InfiniteHero Entrepreneur Premium Member

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    Very good job, now you see first hand the difficulties in cutting. Gaps are really not a huge issue, being where they usually are, but for me kinda ruins the sale, when I do them. Hand cutting, personally I think I toasted 3-4 lenses learning that process, and even with the optical machine I use now, I still toast a lens every now and then. Nothing is perfect. Glad to see the hard work pay off for you. Great write up.
     
  3. OakleyGuru379

    OakleyGuru379 What is that thing?!

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    Very nice job man!
     
  4. InfiniteHero

    InfiniteHero Entrepreneur Premium Member

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    My First Real Lens Cutting Journey - IMG_20130906_144424_511_zpsc11d9b0a.jpg

    Just noticed this part---- Take a look at how the lenses are labeled. Right and left as if you are looking towards the glasses. Typically how Forum members describe the lenses (we stare more than we wear). But Optically when you say right and left, it is meant as Right and Left EYE, so opposite. Now, take a look how you labeled the lenses, compared to that actual donor lens. Opposite sides you are making the cut for. The issue is that Prism based lenses (such as Oakleys and others) are "Base in Prism" . The Prism effect built into the Factory lens, i.e... donor, will be the opposite for the new cut. So not correct. (This is in part what I mean in my lenses when I say, lenses are optically centered for the cut) In this case and cutting a small lens from more towards the center, this effect may not be too bad, or even noticeable, but if this was done on a R1, or Juliet, there would be a noticeable difference. Scientific explanation is provided below.

    Optical Professionals use prism correction as a correction in Lenses. A lens with prism correction displaces the image, which is used to treat muscular imbalance or other conditions (Highly Curved or wide angle lenses) that cause errors in eye orientation. Prism correction is measured in prism dioptres. A prescription that specifies prism correction will also specify the "base", which is the direction of displacement. Whether a lens needs this type of correction or not is determined by the Polar Test (or Pola-Test: a test for the evaluation of binocular vision) elaborated by Dr Haase.

    Prism dioptres
    Prism correction is commonly specified in prism dioptres, a unit of angular measurement that is loosely related to the dioptre. The prism dioptre of a lens is equal to one hundred times the tangent of the angle by which it displaces an image seen through the lens.

    A prism of power 1Δ would produce 1 unit of displacement for an object held 100 units from the prism. Thus a prism of 1Δ would produce 1 cm visible displacement at 100 cm, 2Δ would produce 2 cm displacement at 100 cm, and so on.

    My First Real Lens Cutting Journey - 5030674bc0f23b2375883933fbc0df94.png
    where My First Real Lens Cutting Journey - 44c29edb103a2872f519ad0c9a0fdaaa.png is the amount of prism correction in prism dioptres, and My First Real Lens Cutting Journey - 8277e0910d750195b448797616e091ad.png is the angle of deviation of the light.

    For a prism with apex angle My First Real Lens Cutting Journey - 0cc175b9c0f1b6a831c399e269772661.png and refractive index My First Real Lens Cutting Journey - 7b8b965ad4bca0e41ab51de7b31363a1.png ,

    My First Real Lens Cutting Journey - eeaaae0b079abd4da33c80a3acf9be9a.png .
    Prentice's rule: (hehehe My Rule)
    Prentice's rule is a formula used to determine the amount of induced prism in a lens:
    My First Real Lens Cutting Journey - 2f302b76d26eb0693767d2230d777ddc.png
    where:
    P is the amount of prism correction (in prism dioptres)
    c is decentration (the distance between the pupil centre and the lens's optical centre, in centimetres)
    f is lens power (in dioptres)
    The primary use of Prentice's rule is that under certain circumstances, the prism can be obtained without grinding prism into the lenses, by decentering the lenses as worn by a person.

    An additional use of the rule, is for determining the amount of unprescribed prism that is introduced if the lens is not correctly centred on the wearer's pupil. This can be used for tolerance control of lenses, for example when glasses must be made with lenses that are wide angle or high curvature.
     
    borgs, salj838 and Rezechs like this.
  5. qtrain23

    qtrain23 3D Printing Protege

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    While that was an epic post, I believe he's using the correct side lens for the correct side.

    For the OP, As a rule of thumb, left and right directions are always given as you're using the object (as you're wearing the glasses) just like IH said
     
  6. qtrain23

    qtrain23 3D Printing Protege

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    Check it out
    My First Real Lens Cutting Journey - e2unadup.jpg

    His lens shape for left and right matches up to the lenses when viewing from head on
     
  7. InfiniteHero

    InfiniteHero Entrepreneur Premium Member

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    Q, take a look again. he labeled the right eye OP lens, with the cut (as if your looking head on) for the right eye. That is opposite. I know it's confusing, but really look and think about it and you will see. I had to take another look after your post, and think too.
     
  8. qtrain23

    qtrain23 3D Printing Protege

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    I agree that they're labeled backwards from what they should be, but he was consistent. Right from the front with right from the front.

    Right?
     
    borgs likes this.
  9. Rezechs

    Rezechs Oakley Enthusiast

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    I cut the right lens i believe, looking from the pair of my buddy's crosshairs i matched the lenses to a pair that i had, i then put the matching side mars lenses on the donor lenses to trace ...i know this cuz the first masking i did was wrong and realized the shape was wrong just before i started cutting into it so i decided to get a pair for reference. =)
     
  10. InfiniteHero

    InfiniteHero Entrepreneur Premium Member

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    Its all in learning, and it does get confusing sometimes. If you look at the trace of the "R", that is for the right lens when looking at the Mars Glasses. Not an issue there. But then look at the donor lens that it is traced on. That is the Left eye lens when looking at them. So opposite of what you would want. Probably not a big issue for this cut and pair of glasses, but would make the difference in other pairs