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  1. freakface

    freakface Oakley Collector

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    i need the knowledge of my O brothers here on the forum...

    how can one tell if the lenses on hand are OEM oakley lenses and not some aftermarket crap? is there any way to tell without using special machinery to measure specs? since many of us buy on ebay and there are many aftermarket lenses that look very much like oem, this is a good thing to know.

    help me out...
     
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  2. dr.chop

    dr.chop Oakley Expert

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    yes, easily. Bevel is the first way. Oakley is more Rounded with a peak where the front and rear bevel unites unless it is a sharp one. Also, Oakley lenses are thicker in the inside nose area and thinner to the outside edge (taper) by roughly 20%-25% this is the taper correction in the XYZ/HDO optics. Aftermarket are not taper corrected, and if they are, they are stealing the Oakley patent
     
  3. freakface

    freakface Oakley Collector

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    i did NOT understand half of what you mentioned Doc. haha. when i said i need knowledge, i meant that in the literal sense. bevel? and i do not have any measuring gadget and do not even know where to start... really not a hand-on guy...
     
  4. Lumbergh

    Lumbergh Oakley Enthusiast

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    Best way to tell:


    By them directly from Oakley.
     
  5. freakface

    freakface Oakley Collector

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    not really helpful. i already mentioned buying from ebay, which most of us do. and not everyone has access to buy replacement lenses from oakley.
     
  6. dr.chop

    dr.chop Oakley Expert

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    If you can't visually see the difference in thickness, you clearly have no reason to worry. If all else fails, do what Lumbergh recommended and don't be an @$$ next time. Can you tell that a sheet of paper is thinner than say, oh, a quarter or nickel? Yah, wooo whoooo then you can tell the inside of a lens is thicker than the outside. The bevel, as in the cut on the edge, traditionally is uniform and more rounded on a real lens rather than rough and sharp cornered on a $20 ebay junk lens...Otherwise, enjoy your ebay junk...
     
  7. freakface

    freakface Oakley Collector

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    thanks doc. did not expect as a$$ reply from that guy and especially not from you, since i am inquiring as a member that does not have much experience. and not all aftermarket lenses has a "sheet of paper/quarter or nickel" thickness difference, that i know of anyway. (which is very little), and thus my inquiry.
    although i should have mentioned that i have yet to take out lenses from my oaks, and therefore cannot judge the smoothness of the cut.
    but thank you for the info, it helps a bit for us laymen...
     
  8. freakface

    freakface Oakley Collector

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    mods, please lock thread, seems like my question was attracting some answers that are not helpful and triggers problems. but really, thanks anyway doc. and i am not meaning to hit on you, fyi.
     
  9. JDubs

    JDubs Oakley Enthusiast

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    I have some VL lenses and I can totally tell the difference. They are definitely not as thick. I also just a scale and weigh them or tap them on a counter to see if they make the same noise as the OEM that came with the glasses.
     
  10. RomeoNo.1

    RomeoNo.1 Oakley Beginner

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    I've read the lens patents, Oakley lenses are primarily cut from a block of pure polycarbonate base prism, during the cutting process, they have applied a mathematic equation for curve and thickness of the lens for the prismatic correction of the lens to maintain focal points of the eyes. That's what Dr. Chop described with the thick front nose point to the thin taper on sides of the glasses. Light gets correctly focused to the eye and distortion is minimized.
     
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