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  1. InfiniteHero

    InfiniteHero Entrepreneur Premium Member

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    For sale is a Custom Machine Cut from Oakely Donor lenses, a Romeo 1 Fire Iridium set. These are slightly oversized to allow for imperfections with the castings of Romeos. Should be a really tight fit. I noticed in my research that alot of Factory R1 lenses have gaps or imperfections in places. It appears that is fairly normal due to the first gen Xmetal casting processes. These lenses were cut from a Oakley Donor lens and optically centered for the cut for optical precision. Price is 100.00 shipped. I will promise you a proper fit with any lenses I sell. Ships CONUS Priority Mail in a box. This is a little unorthodox, but please post your comments even if you are not going to buy them. I would like to know if this is a direction members would be interested in. Also other color ways that would be wanted would be nice to know. Thanks.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: 5/21/14
    lithiumus, Oakley-olic and Ares176 like this.
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  2. nightpusher1

    nightpusher1 Guest

    Etching X-Metal onto lenses = forgery.
     
  3. Malv1

    Malv1 Oakley Collector

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    Why so? I have been looking for a factory set of black iridium R1 lenses and can't find them... I am almost to the point of having a custom cut set plus the etching... As long as the buyer/seller know they are original then no harm... It would different if you could still get them from Oakley but since they have no interest in replenishing my lenses then I will get them on my own
     
  4. Oakley-olic

    Oakley-olic Oakley Expert Premium Member Lifetime Member

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    Looks awesome and good fires are hard to find. I do like that R1 too, package deal?
     
  5. nightpusher1

    nightpusher1 Guest

    Its all very well to say" As long as the buyer/seller know they are original then no harm.". by which I take it you mean NOT original,the problem arises when people by a fake set then sell them as originals , for 3 times cost, then the buyer does not know he is buying a reproduction, I have no problem with cutting lenses from Oakley material ,I do it myself, but why does anybody want to reproduce the etching on R1s ans IH Juliets it will only serve to devalue the originals which a lot of us have spent a lot of time and money securing ,if the forged lens stays with the original purchaser,no real harm done I suppose, they are only kidding themselves, but when they are sold on- and they will be then you run the risk of people being duped into buying them as originals.I am amazed that any real Oakley enthusiast thinks this is okay.
     
  6. InfiniteHero

    InfiniteHero Entrepreneur Premium Member

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    All of the above posts have their points, and all of it included is well taken. Not sure of the legality of etching something like the IH cross, or X-Metal. That will be something to check into. Definitely wouldn't want to do something illegal in the first place, second the etchings are a huge pain to have done, But some of this is all under the same umbrella. Cut lenses from a Oakely factory lens to fit a different frame. The precision and quality of Cut lenses can match the factory lenses no problem. This in turn means someone could act like they are a real and rare lens and sell it also. That can apply to anything that is made for the Xmetal line aftermarket. So sometimes just cause there is a chance someone will be dishonest, doesn't make it illegal.

    Authenticity of item---Now there is a debate to have on a specific thread for it. Food for thought "An Oakley Cut Fire Lens for the Romeo1 is technically absolutely no different than the one sold 12 years ago. (NO ETCH) How does that devalue the pair of Glasses. It is still a Oakley lens, cut out of the same material as the factory, same optics, not sure what the difference really is. Originality points maybe, but in the end still a Oakley optical lens.

    I personally, am on the fence for the Originality of the Pair of Glasses myself. If this pair shown in my pic, is sold with the identical same item beside it, with a FACTORY etched lens, How much of a price difference would there be. If any. On this Forum that really has not been discussed and common ground reached.
     
  7. nightpusher1

    nightpusher1 Guest

    IH - Firstly thank-you for such a reasoned and articulate response, I think most would agree that if etching is illegal it should not be done,however should it transpire that etching is legal ,the question is should it be done?If the reproduction etched lens could be guaranteed to stay with the original purchaser I think there would be no real issue,however ,I think most would accept that this will not happen. I agree that the lens you pictured is equal to the factory lens and I would happily use it or sell it as a custom cut Oakley lens,actually that is all you could sell it as because it is minus the etching.The real point is a custom lens with no etching is unmistakably a custom lens and bought as such,if these reproduction etched lenses come onto the market no one will know for sure what they are buying
    I think that would be a shame.
     
  8. rmontez

    rmontez Oakley Expert Premium Member

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    I don't see where custom cutting devalues the glasses at all. I have a set being custom cut right now from Oakley donor lenses. People are still putting in VL and Walleva lenses and selling for 6 to 8 hundred on Ebay. I also don't see where etching would be illegal. The X-Metal is no describing any type of lens or anything specific about what the lens can do it just says these are X-Metal glasses. It's not like etching "polarized" into a non-polarized lens.
     
  9. CarGuy

    CarGuy Oakley Expert Premium Member Lifetime Member

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    I have a 1969 Mustang Convertible and when I restored it 18 years ago some parts were worn out and either: a) not available directly through Ford. b) available as NOS through 3rd party at RIDICULOUS prices. c) available as reproduction (repop) parts.
    So the options were to stop and leave the car a basket case and scrap all or buy what I could from Ford and the rest where I could. The fact that I used repop parts does not change the fact that the car is still a 1969 Mustang. It's not a "survivor", but its still a rolling piece of art whose value will be decided by the next owner if I ever sell it.
    That having been said, I think that there are some parallels here and a couple of important ones: you basically cannot get OEM R1 lenses at any price and repops that are available are of questionable optical quality.
    So I really like the newfound ability to use OEM lenses as base for restoration lenses for R1's. Using them makes the R1 no longer a "survivor" but they are still eyewear "art" whose value will be decided by the buyer.
    Etching is probably a trademark issue but I don't have a problem with that either if it is done on OEM lenses and that is my opinion only. However, once that horse is out of the barn its out for good because the original etcher will know what they are but once they change hands the "title" is effectively "washed".
    As expressed in another post, caveat emptor reigns supreme here too. Who knows, stress fractures might actually become fashionable as indicators of originality!
     
    Jay82 likes this.
  10. InfiniteHero

    InfiniteHero Entrepreneur Premium Member

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    Guys, I am going to see what we can do to get this moved to Discussions. Really not for this exchange at this time. Will respond more.