1. Want to see less ads, private areas and be able to post? Register Today to receive all these benefits and more!
Dismiss Notice

Want to see less ads, post content and the ability to buy & sell Oakleys?

Register Today or Login

  1. mcs33

    mcs33 Oakley Beginner

    Messages:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    1
    I've been wanting to get the M Frame heater sunglasses for over a year, but when I select the polarized option the price goes up to $260.. why are they so expensive? My REI ones are polarized and were only $30. I'd probably be distracting while I'm rowing worried about dropping them in the water or something.
     
    Shade Station Oakley Sunglasses

    Register to Not see this ad
  2. OakleyJared

    OakleyJared Oakley Enthusiast

    Messages:
    356
    Trophy Points:
    123
    There is always a premium on polarized as you are adding a filter to the lens and this causes extra steps in the production process. With that said you are looking at a shield lens which is 5x more difficult to produce than smaller lenses. You usually see about a $50 difference in non polar and polar. Once you jump to single lens frames (Batwolf, Radar, M Frame, Offshoot...etc) you usually see about $90 difference. Although I believe there will be a price change that will lower that a bit soon) Don't get us started on your $30 polar glasses!
     
  3. Batwolf

    Batwolf Double Team Premium Member

    Messages:
    6,170
    Trophy Points:
    893
    The difference is also the method of Oakley's polarization vs other companies.

    Oakley does an injection molding when polarizing a lens, this method provides for the best clarity possible because you aren't using layers to achieve that affect, which is what most companies do (Maui Jim, Ray Ban, etc). Layers create distortion, give depth perception issues and can peel off.

    When going to a shield lens, the injection process is much more difficult to achieve which is why there is a price premium on those lenses. Although sometimes the price difference is insane.

    To make a long story short, you get what you pay for.
     
    Rahul likes this.
  4. NUMBER 2

    NUMBER 2 Oakley Collector

    Messages:
    1,496
    Trophy Points:
    493
    Nice explanation Bat, I didn't know this.
     
  5. OakleyGuru379

    OakleyGuru379 What is that thing?!

    Messages:
    7,298
    Trophy Points:
    1,223
    Why is anything so expensive? Just like anything else, if you think the price is ridiculous, dont buy it.
     
  6. Chelas

    Chelas Oakley Beginner

    Messages:
    292
    Trophy Points:
    93
    Speaking of polarized , Pilots hate em, the glass cockpits and some instruments on board become unreadable with polarized sunglasses
     
  7. Teetogreen

    Teetogreen Oakley Collector

    Messages:
    2,232
    Trophy Points:
    323
    Great info. Thanks
     
  8. Lamsouth

    Lamsouth Oakley Beginner

    Messages:
    115
    Trophy Points:
    93
    Interesting explanation on the lens production of the polarized lenses. I learned something good today.
     
  9. Gh0zt36

    Gh0zt36 Oakley Beginner

    Messages:
    7
    Trophy Points:
    3
    Ya think you could get started on 30 dollar polarized? I know oakley puts alot of effort in making their lenses but what is the difference between cheap polarized and say oakleys?

    Is the difference huge or minute?
     
  10. OakleyJared

    OakleyJared Oakley Enthusiast

    Messages:
    356
    Trophy Points:
    123
    Batwolf explains the process pretty well above.

    Plus some $30 glasses do not block out 100% UVA and UVB. Oakley does plus 100% UVC and 400 nm of blue light. Some inexpensive glasses block 60% UVA and 40% UVB and are allowed to put 100% UV protection stickers on their glasses. Because of this since your eyes are shaded your iris opens and can let more UV into your eye than wearing no sunglasses at all.

    Cheaper polarized glasses can have the polarized filter simply layered on the outside of the lens so that when you scratch your lens you are actually scratching the polar filter.

    There are obviously differences in impact resistance.

    That's a start. And I didn't mean to imply your $30 glasses specifically do all these things. I have sold eyewear for 15 years and have had many customers ask the same question. I have also seen these customers try nicer sunglasses (not only Oakley) and come back and tell me they can never go back. It is true that you get what you pay for.
     
    Gh0zt36 and Brett28 like this.