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X-Metal Romeo 1 imperfections and a few questions!

Taridium

Oakley Beginner
3
3
Hey everyone, I'm new to this forum and I'm very glad to have found that there is still support/information and a good following for what I believe to be the pinnacle of Oakley's sunglasses line, X-metal frames.

I remember buying my first pair quite a while ago, and I honestly wish I'd purchased more, because I truly believed things would only 'get even better from there'. :)

I own a pair of Romeo 1's still with the box and coin etc, and noticed there are some imperfections in the frame. Using the forum's knowledge and guides I quickly came to the realization that I should've pulled these apart a long time ago, and bought replacement parts. The rubber gaskets of the original literally flaked off and disintegrated as I carefully disassembled the frames. The original iridium lenses have taken damage from the issue the Romeo 1's have with lense cracking. Fortunately, the etched lense (left) is perfectly intact, and the only damage done was to the right. Barely noticeable but there, I will work to find a mint condition right lense in the future. But for now, I bought Linegear's products, embedded Flash black lenses which seem to visually be a very good match to the originals, albeit slightly thicker.

Before this story ends happily with the install of the Linegear lenses, I need to ask advice of the forums as to what to do with the imperfection, which is shown in the attached picture. I'm assuming this is excess 'flash' from the molding process that was originally used, and this is problematic as this flashing comes into contact with the right lense, eventually scratching the surface if not worse.

I come from a engineering and metalworking background, and I'm confident that I can use my own tools to remove this excess material and enact the repair, however the process that was used to put the finish on the frames must be electroplating of some sort. Best case scenario, I'm able to control the rotary tool so there is only a tiny bit of exposed metal visible, worst case, there's a lot of exposed metal visible. Can anyone provide me with better information as to how I would go about re-coating a small area left behind? Part of me thinks that the ultimate answer to this is "nah you have to blast and redo the whole thing." I'd rather not do that though because I want to preserve as much of the original work as possible, and from work experience, color matching finishes is USUALLY a nightmare.

Thank you all for your time!
RomeoFlashReee.jpg
 
I'd keep it as is. I've refinished quite a few r1 and that's the first I've seen with it like that. Makes it unique, the earlier x metals had slight variations which made em all a little different. That one is just a little more different than others which makes it cool to me. O matter every frame is identical, x metals each one is a little different that's how they're meant to be.
 
Hey everyone, I'm new to this forum and I'm very glad to have found that there is still support/information and a good following for what I believe to be the pinnacle of Oakley's sunglasses line, X-metal frames.

I remember buying my first pair quite a while ago, and I honestly wish I'd purchased more, because I truly believed things would only 'get even better from there'. :)

I own a pair of Romeo 1's still with the box and coin etc, and noticed there are some imperfections in the frame. Using the forum's knowledge and guides I quickly came to the realization that I should've pulled these apart a long time ago, and bought replacement parts. The rubber gaskets of the original literally flaked off and disintegrated as I carefully disassembled the frames. The original iridium lenses have taken damage from the issue the Romeo 1's have with lense cracking. Fortunately, the etched lense (left) is perfectly intact, and the only damage done was to the right. Barely noticeable but there, I will work to find a mint condition right lense in the future. But for now, I bought Linegear's products, embedded Flash black lenses which seem to visually be a very good match to the originals, albeit slightly thicker.

Before this story ends happily with the install of the Linegear lenses, I need to ask advice of the forums as to what to do with the imperfection, which is shown in the attached picture. I'm assuming this is excess 'flash' from the molding process that was originally used, and this is problematic as this flashing comes into contact with the right lense, eventually scratching the surface if not worse.

I come from a engineering and metalworking background, and I'm confident that I can use my own tools to remove this excess material and enact the repair, however the process that was used to put the finish on the frames must be electroplating of some sort. Best case scenario, I'm able to control the rotary tool so there is only a tiny bit of exposed metal visible, worst case, there's a lot of exposed metal visible. Can anyone provide me with better information as to how I would go about re-coating a small area left behind? Part of me thinks that the ultimate answer to this is "nah you have to blast and redo the whole thing." I'd rather not do that though because I want to preserve as much of the original work as possible, and from work experience, color matching finishes is USUALLY a nightmare.

Thank you all for your time!View attachment 1026263
I've had one with that before and it always left a mark on whatever lens i stuck in there that's why i only used 2 sets for that frame. That's the only disadvantage
 
Cool story and thanks for the pic of the imperfection! I have a pair of polished Juliet with a similar issue, though not as visible as yours. Any set of lenses that goes into it is immediately damaged in one area. My wife actually uses the pair, so no real problem, but removing it would be easier since the finish is polished anyway. Does the serial on the box match the frame?
 
Last edited:
You may be able to remove the flash with an appropriate rotary tool.

I agree with the others; the entire frame would likely need to be refinished if you don't want the raw metal.

I do think the wear (patina) that the X-Metal frames naturally develop over time is part of their charm. It shows off the authenticity of the materials and the industrial/military/"punk" aesthetic. They almost look better when it looks like they've been thru a warzone or two. A testament to the quality.

Few other pieces of eyewear/jewelry can age this well. I think there's a benefit to embracing it.
 

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